19 May 2007 04:15

SOMALIA WATCH

 
Column
  • Title: [SW Column] (Dr. O. S. Hersi) Exploring Somalia's Natural Resources - A geological perspective.
  • Posted by/on:[AMJ][Friday, November 10, 2000]
  •  
  • Opinions expressed in this column are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of SW.


     
      
     
      Exploring Somalia's Natural Resources - A geological perspective.
     
    Dr. Osman Salad Hersi, Quebec Geoscience
    Center, Quebec
     
    Abstract

    Somalia is that part of the northeast Africa sometimes termed as the Horn of Africa. The country has a land area of 637,540 square kilometers, a coastal line of 3,025 kilometers long, and a population of about 7 to 8 million. Hot, arid to semiarid climate prevails in most of the country with a rainfall less than 600 mm/year. The natural resources of the country can be generally divided into 1) Marine resources (fish and salt) 2) surface resources (e.g., forests, wild life, frankincense and Myrrh, surface water, etc), and subsurface resources (e.g., rocks and minerals, fossil fuels, and groundwater). Rocks and minerals that are known to exist and available for exploitation include Tin in the Majiyahan - Dhalan area (south of Bosaso - Ceelayo costal strip), Uranium in the Galgadud and Bur Hakaba areas, Sepiolites of Ceel Bur, Iron-ore in the Dinsor district, quartz, granite, marble, limestone and gypsum  in different regions of the country. These natural resources include primary row materials for various kinds of industry, e.g, cement industry, industry for prefabricated walls, roofing, floor and wall tiles, aggregates and concrete production, and industrial minerals. Minerals with high potential include gold, zinc, lead, manganese, aluminum, and graphite. Existence of good petroleum indicators has been known for a while, and recent data highly encourage the exploration potential of the country. Water resources are the most need commodity in
    Somalia, and many areas with promising considerable groundwater accumulation have been identified.

    Since we have so many surface, subsurface, and marine resources, then why are we starving? The answer could be summarized as follows:

    1- Lack of technology, security, and political stability.

    2- Scarcity of professionals and skilled people, and struggle for survival for those few available
    professionals;

    3- Mismanagement and/or lack of sincere, capable, and responsible administration.

    RECOMMENDATIONS

    TO THE SOMALIS:

    1- TRUST THAT WE HAVE AMPLE NATURAL RESOURCES;
    2- IMPROVE OUR SKILLS AND PERFECT OUR PROFESSIONS;
    3- INFORM OUR RICHNESS & THE NEED FOR A GOOD GOVERNANCE;
    4- DATA COLLECTION.
     
    TO THE FUTURE SOMALI GOVERNMENT

    1- SOMALI REGIONS / STATES SHOULD TAKE RESPONSIBILITY OF DEVELOPING THE NATURAL RESOURCES OF THEIR TERRITORIES;
    2- GOOD FOREIGN POLICY, FACILITATION OF INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENTS, REPATRIATION OF THE SKILLED SOMALIS, ETC.


    TO THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY

    1- HELP SOMALIA MORALLY AND MATERIALLY TO ALLEVIATE THE WOUNDS OF THE CIVIL WAR AND TO ESTABLISH GOOD GOVERNANCE;
    2- HELP DATA COLLECTION AND PRESERVATION;
    3- AT THIS CRITICAL STAGE, CONTRIBUTE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOST-NEEDED NATURAL RESOURCES: THE WATER;
    4- SUPPORT THE STABLE REGIONS TO DEVELOP THEIR NATURAL RESOURCES;
    5- ACCOUNTABILITY.
     

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    The above is the abstract of a major paper presented at the conference Rebirth of the Somali State-Policy Options and Programme Opportunities for Canada, sponsored by the Som-Can Institute for Research and Development (SCIRD) in collaboration with Partnership Africa Canada (PAC). The two-day conference was held at Parliament Hill's Railway Committee Room and at Carlton University's Southern Hall, Theatre B.

    The main objectives of the conference were:

    • To inform the Canadian Government, NGOs and the International community about the current political changes with respect to Somalia.
    • To present some lessons learned from the Somali peace process.
    • Discuss how Canada, International community and the Somali Diaspora can play a role in the reconstruction of Somalia.
    Invitees included representatives from the following:
    • Canadian Government
    • Canadian NGOs and other institutions
    • Somali NGOs and Civil Society
    • Somali Diaspora in Canada, including youth representatives
    • United Nations
    • Media
     
    PROVISIONAL CONFERENCE PROGRAMME
    253D Parliament Hill, Ottawa
     
    Friday, November 3, 2000
     
    Session 1
     
    Rebirth of Somalia State: Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
     
    9:00 am-12:00pm
     
    Welcoming/Introduction
     
    Chair: Mrs. Idil Salah and Mr. Ahmed Yusuf
     
    Speakers:
     
    Mr. Ahmed Dahir Shell
    Title: The Cry of Somali Civil Society for Peace
     
     
    Prespectives from the Recovery Zones for Lasting Peace
     
    Mr. Ahmed M. Haji-Jama (Northeast Regions knowns as PUNTLAND)
    Title: Puntland State Rejects the Outcome of "Arta(Djibouti) Process" As it was Undemocratic, Unrepresentative and Illegal
     
    Mrs. Zaynab Aden (Northwest Regions known as SOMALILAND)
    Title: Somaliland Does NOT Recognize the Transitional Government Appointed in Djibouti
     
    Questions/Discussions
     
    11:00-11:15 am        Break
     
    Strategic Planning: Concrete Recommendations from within on
     
    " How can Somali Diaspora community contribute to strengthen the Somalia Peace and Development".
     
    Session 11
     
    1:30 Registration (Cont):
     
    2:00pm. Introduction: Mrs. Ebyan Salah, Executive Director
    Som-Can Institute for Research and Development (SCRID)
     
    2:15pm -6:15pm
     
    Key Note Speaker
     
    Mr. Eugene Bellemara
    Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for International Cooperation
     
    Theme: The Political Achievments and the Challenges Ahead
     
    Chairperson: Mr. Ahmed Abdi Hashi Hashara
     
    Speakers:
     
    Mr. Rooble Colhaye, Djibouti Ambassador to the UN
    Title: Djibouti Peace Initiative for Somalia
     
    Mr. Ahmed Dahir Shell, Co-Chair Technical Committee for Somalia Peace Conference
    Title: Peace From Within
     
    Dr. Babafemi A. Badejo, Senior Political Advisor, UN Political Office for Somalia (UNPOS)
    Title: Somalia, the United Nations's Role in the Somalia Peace Process and Future Commitments
     
    4.30 pm Coffee/Tea Break
     
    5pm-6.15pm Questions period, Discussion and Recommendations
     
    6.15pm Concluding Remarks: Mr. Bernard Taylor, PAC
     
    Saturday, November 4, 2000
    Carlton University's Southern Hall, Theatre B.
     
    9:00-12:30 Theme: Strengthening Somalia's Public and Private Sector
     
    Chair: Mrs. Idil Salah, Development Anthropologist/Consultant
     
    Mr. Mohamed Dalmar MBA, Settlement Counselor
    Title: Monetary Experience of Somalia: What can we learn from the past mistakes?
     
    Mr. Abdishakur Abdulle, MA/PhD Candidate/ Research Scientist
    Title: Prioritization and Investment for Health and Education_a Path to Social Development for Somalia
     
    Dr. Osman Salad Hersi (PhD), Geologist and Researcher
    Title: Exploring Somalia's Natural Resources_Geological Perspectives
     
    Mr. Mohamed Elmi, Managing Partner with potfolio of Director of Sales/Marketing and Customer Relations of HornAfrik Media Inc
    Title: Communication as a Symbol for the Enterprising Private Sectors
     
    10:45-11:15 Coffee/Tea Break
     
    Discussion and Recommendations
    Concluding Remarks
     
    12: 30-1:00 Lunch/Prayer/Networking

    [Column]

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